Mutual Funds (?)

Definitions of Mutual Fund on the Web:

Fund operated by an investment company that raises money from shareholders and invests it in stocks, bonds, options, commodities or money market securities.
www.galeit.com/glossary_of_financial_terms.htm

An investment company that pools the money of many individual investors to purchase stocks, bonds or other financial instruments. Professional management and diversification are the two primary benefits of mutual fund investing. A management fee is charged for these services, typically 1% or 2% a year. Funds also levy other fees and charge a sales commission (or load) if purchased from a financial adviser. Funds are either open-end or closed-end. An open-end fund will issue new shares when investors put in money and redeem shares when investors withdraw money. The price of a share is determined by dividing the total net assets of the fund by the number of shares outstanding. Closed-end funds issue a fixed number of shares in an initial public offering, trading thereafter in the open market. Open-end funds are the most common type of mutual fund.
 
datek.smartmoney.com/glossary/index.cfm

A pool of money from a number of investors that is invested by professional money managers according to stated investment objectives. Shares of the fund are offered, usually on a continuous basis, and can be sold back to the fund anytime at that day’s share price.
atwork.harvard.edu/b-glossary.html

A savings fund that uses cash from a pool of savers to buy a wide range of securities, like stocks, bonds, and real estate. This is a way to diversify your investments because you own small units of each of the fund's investments. The fund is managed by professionals and permits small amounts of money to be invested.
www.themint.org/glossary/index.php

An investment company that pools money from shareholders and invests it in a variety of securities, including stocks, bonds, and short-term money market instruments. As open-ended investments, most mutual funds continuously offer new shares to investors.
www.federatedinvestors.com/education/glossary.asp

A type of investment in which the money of many investors is pooled together to buy a portfolio of different securities. The fund is managed by a professional who invests in stocks, bonds, options, money market instruments or other securities.
www.fcac-acfc.gc.ca/eng/glossary.asp

An investment company that pools money from shareholders and invests in a variety of securities, including stocks, bonds and money market instruments. A mutual fund stands ready to buy back (redeem) its shares at their current net asset value, which depends on the total market value of the fund's investment portfolio at the time of redemption. As open-end investments, most mutual funds continuously offer new shares to investors.
www.schwab.com/SchwabNOW/ReDir/1,5348,%7C64%7C,00.html

An investment product in which your money is pooled with the money of many other investors. A professional manager(s) uses the pooled money to buy a portfolio of investments or securities, and monitors each of the investments on an ongoing basis. There are many varieties of mutual funds, each with specific objectives. By investing in a mutual fund, you purchase units of that fund. The value of your units can go up or down depending on the type and performance of the mutual fund.
www.yourmoney.cba.ca/eng/glossary.cfm

An investment company that combines the money of a large number of people and invests it in a variety of securities in an effort to achieve a specific objective over time. The pooled money is invested by full time investment professionals. Open-ended mutual funds, like Berger's, offer daily liquidity, which means you can redeem your shares at the then-current net asset value (NAV). Features and benefits of mutual funds.
www.bergerfunds.com/planning/education/glossary.html

A mutual fund is a pool of assets invested on behalf of investors. Mutual funds invest in a diversified portfolio of securities, which can include equity securities (such as common and preferred shares), debt securities (such as bonds and debentures) and other financial instruments issued by corporations and governments, according to the stated investment objectives of the funds. Individual investors own a percentage of the value of the fund as represented by the number of units they purchase. A collection of money invested in a group of assets and managed by an investment company (a mutual fund company or other). The money comes from investors who want to buy shares in the fund. The benefits to investors in buying shares of mutual funds come primarily from diversification, professional money management, and capital gains and dividend reinvestment.
www.sentinelbenefits.com/Glossary-New.html

An investment company which pools the money of many investors. A professional portfolio manager manages the fund. Mutual funds help spread out an investor's risk because they invest in many different stocks, bonds, and cash-type investments.
www.strongkids.com/lib/dictionary.htm

An investment company that pools money from shareholders and invests in a variety of securities, including stocks, bonds and money market securities.
www.investing.rutgers.edu/Glossary.htm

An open-ended fund operated by an investment company which raises money from shareholders and invests in a group of assets, in accordance with a stated set of objectives.
www.wdfi.org/ymm/kids/glossary/default.asp

A company that pools money to invest in stocks, bonds or other securities on behalf of a group of investors. The fund is managed by a professional investment manager. Mutual funds offer investors greater diversification because their portfolios consist of many different securities.
www.smithbarney.com/yin/he_dictionary.htm

Mutual funds pool money from multiple investors (shareholders) to buy stocks, bonds, and other securities for the benefit of their shareholders. Mutual funds offer individuals diversification and professional management, but they limit an investor's ability to control his/her holdings and tax liability. Fund owners pay an expense ratio, which is a percentage of their total investment amount.
www.tarausa.com/global/glossary.jsp

A diversified, professionally managed portfolio of securities that pools the assets of individuals and organizations to invest toward a common objective such as current income or long-term growth. Mutual funds are open-ended investment companies and are generally registered with the SEC under the Investment Company Act of 1940. Mutual funds issue redeemable shares and are distinguishable from closed-end funds, whose shares are trades on the secondary market.
www.gmo.com/mygmoasps/glossaryView.asp

Mutual funds are pools of money that are managed by an investment company. They offer investors a variety of goals, depending on the fund and its investment charter. Some funds, for example, seek to generate income on a regular basis. Others seek to preserve an investor's money. Still others seek to invest in companies that are growing at a rapid pace. Funds can impose a sales charge, or load, on investors when they buy or sell shares. Many funds these days are no load and impose no sales charge.
www.womanswallstreet.com/WWS/glossary.aspx

An investment company that pools money from shareholders and invests in a variety of securities, such as stocks, bonds and money market instruments. Most open-end mutual funds stand ready to buy back (redeem) its shares at their current net asset value, which depends on the total market value of the fund s investment portfolio at the time of redemption. Most open-end mutual funds continuously offer new shares to investors.
www.xak.com/main/helpglossary.asp

A pooled investment vehicle whose securities are managed for a fee (annual management fee) by a professional investment advisor. Mutual Funds exist that invest in most investment alternatives available (Stocks, Bonds, etc.).
ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/Bonehead_Finance/bone4c_g.htm

An investment company that pools money from shareholders and invests in a variety of securities, including stocks, bonds, and money market instruments. A mutual fund stands ready to buy back (redeem) its shares at their current net asset value, which depends on the total market value of the fund's investment portfolio at the time of redemption. As open-end investments, most mutual funds continuously offer new shares to investors.
www.westcore.com/InvestorEd/glossary.asp

A registered investment company that pools the money of many individuals and institutions and invests it on their behalf. Mutual funds can invest in a wide variety of investments, including stocks, bonds and money market instruments.
www.nylim.com/eclipsefunds/0,2058,100_1002860,00.html

Also known as an open-end investment company, to differentiate it from a closed-end investment company. Mutual funds invest pooled cash of many investors to meet the fund's stated investment objective. Mutual funds stand ready to sell and redeem their shares at any time at the fund's current net asset value: total fund assets divided by shares outstanding.
www.investinginbonds.com/info/bondbasics/glossary.htm

The fund pools the resources of investors by selling its shares to the public and investing the proceeds of such sale in a portfolio of securities designed to achieve the fund's investment objective. All of the owners in the fund shares participate in the gains or losses of the fund. These products can only be sold by registered representatives. Mutual funds are also known as an open-end diversified management investment company. The basic categories of fund investment objectives are as follows:
www.datalife.com/mall/pages/glossary/GLOSS_M.HTM

An investment company that buys a portfolio of securities selected by a professional investment adviser to meet a specified financial goal. Mutual fund investors buy shares in the fund that represent ownership in all the fund's securities. A mutual funds stands ready to buy back its shares at their current net asset value, which is the total market value of the fund's investment portfolio, minus its liabilities, divided by the number of shares outstanding. Most mutual funds continuously offer new shares to investors.
www.ici.org/i4s/bro_i4s_glossary.html

Mutual funds are pools of money that are managed by an investment company. They offer investors a variety of goals, depending on the fund and its investment charter. Some funds, for example, seek to generate income on a regular basis. Others seek to preserve an investor's money. Still others seek to invest in companies that are growing at a rapid pace. Funds can impose a sales charge, or load, on investors when they buy or sell shares. Many funds these days are no load and impose no sales charge. Mutual funds are investment companies regulated by the Investment Company Act of 1940. Related: open-end fund, closed-end fund.
www.americo.com/glossary/bfglosm.html

A regulated investment company with a pool of assets that regularly sells and redeems its shares
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn

18-JAN-05

[URI Funds] [URI HF 2013] [URI MF 2006] [URI MF 2005] [Getting Started] [Mutual Funds (?)] [Closed-End Funds] [Hedge Funds (?)] [Bond Funds] [Screener] [Pink Vs BB] [Hedge Fund Links] [Mutual Fund Links] [Why So Popular] [GARP] [PRMIA] [Award!]